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20130103
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 7:00am EST
a treatment of a blood clot in her head. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. snow. and heavier amounts over higher elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly clo
NBC
Jan 2, 2013 7:00am EST
science. this is a plan that basically says, you can eat all your calories in your day but you're going to start eating in eight-hour windows even just three days a week, 11:00 to 7:00, 9:00 to 5:00. >> it's controversial. again it goes against some of the things we're going to talk about go against things we've been taught for years. the claims are pretty dramatic. you say if you follow this diet you'll look younger, feel younger and dramatically reduce your risk for getting the major diseases of our time. >> we're sleeping less than ever, working more than ever and eating more than ever, not giving our bodies a chance to process all of the food that we're taking in and all the toxins. by feasting for eight hours and fasting for 16 -- >> of famine -- >> even just three days a week, you'll reset your body to get on that path. i lost seven pounds in ten days when i adopted the plan. >> by the way, people could lose 20 pounds in six weeks. let's start. breakfast, the most important meal of the day? not according to you. >> delay breakfast. get up in the morning. turbo charge your metaboli
NBC
Dec 31, 2012 9:00am EST
think it's done broseph! pretty much got it down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. it's oscar mayer. it's game time food. we're spreading the word about honey bunches of oats fruit blends and their unique taste combinations. like peach/raspberry. with one flavor in the granola bunch and one on the flake. two flavors. in harmony. honey bunches of oats. make your day bunches better. it's about getting fios. that moment after you finally got it that you actually get it. the difference 100% fiber optics makes and you say "woah we are not on cable anymore." when online videos aren't herky jerky, you get it. or when a movie downloads in two minutes, you get it. [ female announcer ] switch to fios internet, tv, and phone for this amazing price online, just $79.99 a month guaranteed for two years with a two-year agreement. plus
NBC
Dec 31, 2012 7:00am EST
blood clot. more from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline to the fiscal cliff draws to within
NBC
Jan 3, 2013 7:00am EST
billion people. >> you want a degree in computer science? >> that's where the premium is. >> to zap pos, online retailer and trader joe's. >> zap pos is based in nevada and has a silicon valley feel. great pay and perks and fun culture. the model there is create a little fun and weirdness. >> i always heard recently airlines are struggling yet you like one airline in particular, southwest airlines. why is that on your list? >> your perception of airlines is right. southwest is the exception. southwest a long time ago decided the best way to forgive their customers a great experience is make sure the people who work there are having a good time. they have great pay, great benefits and really fun culture. >> what jobs specifically might people be looking for at southwest airlines? >> there are a lot of jobs at southwest. it's the same culture. work had the gate, flight attendant, pilot. >> have to have the training to be a pilot. recent college grad, might want to train a little bit. you say the state department and government it contracting company called fci federal are good places. >>
NBC
Dec 27, 2012 7:00am EST
retirement actually becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 6:00am PST
. goodnight, dad. goodnight. come on, lassie. those science fictions magazines have certainly made an impression on him. well let's face it, ruth, this is the space age and timmy's part of it. oh yes, but flying saucers and men from mars, now really it's a little preposterous isn't it? maybe. maybe not. a few years ago we never would have dreamed that we would have had man made satellites, now we're preparing to send men into space. never can tell about some things. strangers come to a foreign planet, and nobody even cares. you saw it with me didn't ya, lassie? it was a flying saucer. ♪ ♪ ♪ they must have landed here and blasted off again. what is it girl? feet prints. lots of them. men from other planets can disappear if they want too. maybe they'll believe us now. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ dad! in that barn son. i found the place where it landed, i knew we saw it last night i knew we did. what did you see? where what landed? the flying saucer. timmy. but it's true mom. there's a big hole where it landed and blasted off again. these little feet prints all around it. feet prints?
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 9:00am EST
down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. it's oscar mayer. >>> still to come on this new year's day, a duet from colbie caillat and gavin degraw. >> and out on the rink. >> after your local news and weather. strength and determination are human too. so are dinner dates and birthday cake. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. built for human nature so you can expect amazing. ♪ on top of the world right now ♪ join for free and expect amazing. because it works. you know you could just use bengay zero degrees. medicated pain relief you store in the freezer. brrr...see ya boys. [ male announcer ] new bengay zero degrees. freeze and move on. >> this is wbal-tv 11 news and a baltimore. >> rain passes to our south. sprinkle out and baltimore, mostly cloudy skies. temperatures hover into the 40's in the afternoon
NBC
Jan 2, 2013 9:00am EST
go.msnacking on! shut up! that's it! pretty much got it down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. it's oscar mayer. it's game time food. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. now is the best time to stock up and save... ...at petsmart. save up to 25% on thousands of items during the petsmart stock up and save sale. and save up to $4 on wellness® dog food. at petsmart®. this is so so soft. hey hun, remember you only need a few sheets. hmph! [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 4:00am EST
the stealing of 100 unique meteorites. loaned to a north carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered in the christmas eve heist are worth more than $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square, but the folks in lisbon, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve, the town drops these yellow britches in honor of the yellow britches creek. i get it. it's funny. >>> and finally, organizers in is south carolina put the tip theiring toughs to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go and you can watch the entire parade right here on nbc. >>> now to sports. let's get started with college football. good appetite yesterday. clemson down to the kick. time's running out, it's good. clemson upsets number 8 lsu. 25-24. in the sun bowl, georgia tech wins over usc. and the music city bowl, jordan rodgers ran for another score. and the commodores beat north carolina state. to the liberty bowl, three touchdowns beat iowa state 31-17. there a
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 6:00am EST
look for 2013. we have a political science professor, and danny vargas, president and ceo of the communications and marketing firm. welcome to "viewpoint," to you all. >> happy new year. >> i want to take a big picture look back at 2012, and go around and ask each of you what 2012 would be remembered for? >> my background is in politics, so i would have to go with the presidential election, barack obama being re-elected not withstanding some significant economic concerns going into the beginning of 2012, or a year ago at the end of 2011, it was clear the president would have an uphill battle. and three things struck me as interesting. super packs, the billions raised to reshape voter thinking, and particularly senate and house races, you saw a real impact -- >> in our region. >> absolutely in our region. and that was the first thing that struck me, and the second was turnout. i was among those that believed the president would get 95 or 96% of the african-american vote, and it turned out to be the same. and the same with young voters. and nobody expected the turnout to be the sam
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our tech
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro tempor
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 1:00am EST
correspondent for " the christian science monitor," and he has this regular meeting with politically important people with a bunch of reporters present, and they raise the issues of the rumors, and hillary clinton says, "i want you all to know that we have had lot -- trouble in our lives as a married couple, but we love each other. we believe in each other. i love my husband, and we are going to stay together for the rest of our lives," and they are blown away by her commitment. what they do not know is that this is a dress rehearsal, because nine months later, when bill is soaring in the polls, almost on top of the new hampshire primary, a senator from massachusetts, the next door state, at that moment, jennifer flowers says that she has said a 12-year love affair with bill clinton and has the tape recordings to prove it. >> and professor on how the clintons had their relationship benefit their political ambitions. this is continuing four days of nonfiction books and authors through new year's day on c- span's booktv. >> neil armstrong, the first person to walk on the moon, died las
NBC
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am PST
believe in mr. landers and i believe in the science of geology. not in a fork stick. but dad, it really works. mr. landers way will work too, dear. come on now eat your cereal. okay. whatever you say. son, just like planting seeds, timmy. you can just throw them on the ground and they might come up, but if you get the ground ready and you put them in very carefully at the right depth. and then cover them over, you're a lot more certain to get a good crop. ♪ find water yet, mr. landers? not yet, son. right now i'm making a sort of preliminary survey. what's that? seeing the land itself, you know looking at the map is only the beginning. how does it look to you around here mr. landers? well not too good. there's a good deal of serpents out cropping the rock. is that bad? for water yes. gee, lassie he passed right by here. he's not gonna pick this spot. but if he does, we'll prove that we found it first. i'll bury the divining rod right here. so if they dig the well here, we'll show them that mr. wilson was right. ♪ most of the bed rock slopes and angles converge at this particu
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures of my office o
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are extremely clear for anyone who bothers to look. within a half dozen years of the imp
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:00pm EST
at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if y
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in
NBC
Jan 3, 2013 6:00am PST
they really hit the math and science and those things hard and have homework. more arts and crafts today. it's about getting back into a routine and getting into some kind of school structure and being with those classmates, and being together in the classroom. it's going to be tough for the parents as well. in fact, many have told us i'm going to have a hard time letting my kid go back to school. i remember what happened the last time i did. it's tough to let go. those students will be allowed to come to school today -- parents will be allowed to come to school with kids and stay as long as they need to. they'll go through the first half of the day doing arts and crafts and things like that and last half will be more of an open house where they will talk about what's happening and what's working and what's not working and what they need to focus on. as one administrator said, there's no playbook for all of this thankfully. we've never had to go through this before. so we're learning as we go. and we're just trying to keep a focus on what we can do to help these families help these
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so why don't i go to norm
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought this is much more than i thought
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journalists, they wrote books. >> they
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 2:00am EST
sort of as much political science as anything else. anything could big factor. i don't want to sound to nerdly, but the rise of computer-based redistrict teen, strangely enough, that the members of congress and state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few swing seats. we seen a bunch of change in the past couple election, but that's very much the exception rather than the rule. members of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear general elections by and large unless they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't explain the senate because you can't redistrict the senate, but it has had enormous impact at the state and state legislature level in the more polarized politics we have. i also think the news media plays a role in this. they used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news that everybody watched walter cronkite were hotly in brinkley and they sort of made up for, you can argue how successfully, but pla
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)